Zebra striped skin is a natural remedy for flies, and science has no idea why

Zebras do not suffer from the itching caused by flies landing on their backs. Did you know that this is the result of having stripes?

Zebra stripes prevent many insects from landing on their backs. picture: Geo

The evolution of species is not accidental. After all, thousands and thousands of years have allowed new generations to have some of the most unique solutions of previous times. For this reason, we have been able to verify that there are many animals that have adapted to new living conditions by adapting their diet or simply by breathing in a different way. This was the result Adapt to him for a very long time And that although we are not aware of it, it continues to happen.

One of the most curious cases is that of zebras. Being one of the most delicacies of the lions, the king of the savanna, She continues to enjoy some very nice colors. This type of horse stands out, without a doubt, for the black and white stripes present all over its body. How could it be camouflaged to avoid being noticed by predators? The truth is, this alternation of colors seems to have another unexpected function. The arrangement of the striped body is intended to repel insects such as flies.

Let’s see, then, why the scientific community He was unable to determine the cause of this defense mechanism, what are the keys to understanding the function of this graphic to avoid bites and insect approaches, and of course how far we are dealing with an all-natural fly repellent. For this, it was possible to enjoy a comparison of the skin of an impala with the skin of two types of zebras. Does the thickness of the lines affect when doing this job?

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The striped skin of zebras prevents flies from approaching

Nature is wise, and therefore, the striped skin of zebras must have some other advantages. It is true that we do not deal with the species that, for the time being, are included in List of endangered species, but there has been a decrease in the number of samples due to climate change. One of the clues that could explain its evolution is directly related to The ability of the skin to repel flies. This, being in the middle of a savannah in high temperatures, can be pretty annoying.

Among the theories that have been proposed over the years are those mentioned above. However, he wanted to conduct an in-depth study at Princeton with the goal of uncovering the cause of the relationship. It was possible to validate that the skin of these animals repels flies. To do this, Impala skin was suspended and comparisons were made to see How much was the percentage of flies that landed on them. according to Wiredthe results were clear.

However, an alternative study still needs to be done. Could the thickness of the stripes play a role in attracting insects? Maybe It has different skins derived from two types Scheme. The result showed once again how font width hardly matters when it comes to doing its job. Take this discussion to the next level. What is the reason that can cause this result? the study He ended up accepting the “barber’s tavern” idea. Have you noticed the classic height bar found in most barbershops? The optical illusion shows how it seems to generate a prediction about what is there and what is the speed of movement, right?

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In the eyes of the flies, this same sensation can be seen when approaching the body of zebras. Because of this, she would refuse to get close to it by sheer instinct. This was the theory that had the greatest weight among all the others that were proposed, due above all to Previous analyzes that have been performed Regarding the field of view of these insects.

Myrtle Frost

"Reader. Evil problem solver. Typical analyst. Unapologetic internet ninja."

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