Obama says Trump ‘denies reality’ by failing to acknowledge Biden: NPR

Former President Barack Obama speaks at a rally for Joe Biden in Flint on Oct. 31. In an interview with the NPR, Obama said Trump “denies reality” by refusing to acknowledge Biden’s election.

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Former President Barack Obama speaks at a rally for Joe Biden in Flint on Oct. 31. In an interview with the NPR, Obama said Trump “denies reality” by refusing to acknowledge Biden’s election.

Andrew Hornick / A.P.

Former President Barack Obama has strongly condemned President Trump’s refusal to accept the 2020 election, warning of the real-world harm that could result from any delay in the peaceful transfer of power, but said Trump would fail to “deny reality.”

In an interview with the NPA that aired Monday, Obama gave his most detailed comments on the election after Joe Biden’s victory against Trump. Describing Trump’s efforts to overturn the election results and the president ‘s reluctance to cooperate with change, Obama described it as “just another example of how Donald Trump’s violation of basic democratic norms affects the American people.”

Obama’s comments come as he falsely claims that Trump won the election and is following in the footsteps of Hail Mary. Legal strategy To challenge the decision on the basis of unproven and unsubstantiated allegations of fraud. With global approval from Republicans in Congress, the president has formed a united front that has set aside funds to replace the incoming Biden administration with millions of federal dollars, as well as block access to information and corporate officials across the government.

“I’m sorry you did not see the Republican leadership make this clear, because the time lost in the process of this change has real-world consequences,” Obama said. Everything is considered Host Michael Martin. “Look, we’re in the middle of an epidemic. We’m in the middle of an economic crisis. We have serious national security issues.”

Following Obama’s victory in the 2008 election, Obama said Trump’s behavior was a complete departure from how he and his staff were treated by George W. Bush, the last Republican leader to leave the White House.

“For all the differences I had with George W. Bush, he and his administration could not have been more gracious and efficient in working with us to bring about a smooth transition,” Obama said. He said his ability to “immediately explain” everything from the financial crisis to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq by top executives “meant we were running on the ground and allowed our responses to be very effective.”

Republicans have defended the president’s right to exercise all legal options, but among Democrats, Trump’s refusal to acknowledge has been sharply criticized as an attempt to cast a permanent cloud over Biden’s victory. Democrats have denounced Trump’s attempt to hand over the presidency as a resumption of the Brotherhood conspiracy. With many in the Democrats now going with the president, Republicans are signaling that Biden’s calls for bipartisan cooperation have already been lost.

When asked if bipartisanship was a nonsense, Obama said that because of the lack of a majority in the Senate, “Joe Biden will have to work with some Republican colleagues.”

“There’s a way to achieve that, but it’s not a chop,” he said. “There’s a way to continue to offer the opportunity for cooperation, but if Mitch McConnell or others refuse to cooperate, at some point you have to take it to the People’s Court.”

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What Obama failed to recognize, especially at the beginning of his presidency, was that “elections are not punished by the electorate.” He said his advice was, “Are you going to continue to engage, not just Democrats, but anyone who wants to see a functioning, effective government?”

Promised land, By Barack Obama

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Reflections on race

Obama spoke before releasing his new memo on Tuesday, Promised land, Which culminates in the May 2011 assassination attempt on Osama bin Laden, who discovers he climbed into the White House. A second batch covering the remaining years of his presidency is scheduled to follow.

Among the issues he writes is his record of race. Although Obama’s victory in 2008 was celebrated as a milestone in America’s long and complex history, the setback for the first black president in American history helped fuel the rise of Donald Trump.

“Yes, I think what happened during my presidency was a setback for some people who felt that they or their group were somehow symbolizing the possibility of losing status – not because of anything I did, but because of that fact I was not like all the other presidents before,” Obama told the NPR. . At the same time, he said, “you had a whole generation of kids who grew up not thinking it was weird or exceptional that black occupied the highest office on earth.”

That doesn’t mean there hasn’t been progress yet. The deaths of young black men such as Trevor Martin and Michael Brown during Obama’s tenure were again surrounded by lingering tensions on the surface. Two years later in Movin Ferguson.

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Tensions escalated following the death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis last May. Obama said he understands that people are motivated by the speed of progress, and that he too feels frustrated.

“There are times when I am sad, I am angry, I am in pain, I am compelled to not only inflict shocking injustices as we have seen with George Floyd, but also to bend my wife or daughters. But it seems to suggest that it is right, “Obama said. “I think the motivation and feeling of pain and sadness is completely understandable.”

But he said the progress he has made over the race in his lifetime has kept him “from sinking into despair.”

Obama draws inspiration from a younger generation that is very open when it comes to attitudes about not just race, but gender and sexual orientation.

He said that this is the generation that wrote this book to show that there are two competing visions for the world: one is “we are a collection of tribes, we are inevitably at war, it is a zero sum game” and the other is “for all our differences, there is a common humanity, it is a diversity It is possible for us to see each other, to understand each other, to respect each other and to work together in a diverse, very diverse country and world. “

The choice, he said, was theirs.

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