Gender racism: The Taliban allowed women to go to university, but separated from men

“People in Afghanistan will continue to receive higher education under Sharia (Islamic law) rules that prevent mixed classes” (Photo: REUTERS)

Afghan girls will be allowed to study at the university, but co-education will be banned Under his command, the Taliban Minister of Higher Education said.

The extremist Islamist group seized power in mid-August after ousting a pro-Western government He promised to act differently than he had in his previous regime – between 1996 and 2001 – anytime Girls and girls were banned from going to school.

The people of Afghanistan will continue to receive higher education According to Sharia rules (Islamic law) prohibits mixed classesMinister Abdul Baki Haqqani said in a meeting with the so-called old men Loya Jirga, Sunday.

Said The Taliban “must develop a legitimate education program that is compatible with our Islamic, national and historical values ​​and, on the other hand, be able to compete with other countries.”

Afghan women will be allowed to study at universities, but co-education will be banned (Photo: REUTERS)
Afghan women will be allowed to study at universities, but co-education will be banned (Photo: REUTERS)

Young people of both sexes will be separated in primary and secondary schools. Common in a conservative country like Afghanistan.

The Taliban claim to support the advancement of women’s rights, but Only according to the conservative interpretation of Islamic law.

Whether women can work, educate themselves at a higher level, and interact with men are some of the questions most often asked by the audience. But A change in the attitude of the Taliban Is taken with suspicionMoreover, many wonder if they will keep their promises.

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None of the women were present at Sunday’s meeting in Kabul, Other senior Taliban officials attended. The Taliban minister “spoke only to male teachers and students.” Said a student who worked in the university city during the last government.

Young people of both sexes will be separated in primary and secondary schools (Photo: Selectors)
Young people of both sexes will be separated in primary and secondary schools (Photo: Selectors)

“Proper prevention of women’s participation in decisions” and it shows, she said “The distance between the words of the Taliban and their actions.”

The College admission The Western presence has increased over the past 20 years, especially among women who study with men and attend seminars taught by male teachers.

But A series of attacks on educational centers in recent months, leading to dozens of deaths, has created panic among the population. They denied that the Taliban were behind the attackSome of them were claimed by the local body of the Islamic State.

During his previous repressive government, The Taliban excluded women from public life, banned entertainment and imposed harsh punishments Like stoning for prostitutes.

What about work

Some women decide to go back to work in Afghanistan (Photo: REUTERS)
Some women decide to go back to work in Afghanistan (Photo: REUTERS)

Two weeks after the Taliban took power, Some Afghans returned to work amid promises from the country’s new masters, Guaranteed that they would be more tolerant than the previous government.

To see how the Taliban are allowed to resume their operations under Islamic law, other female employees are waiting for approval to return to work.That is, separated from the males.

In Kabul, the nurse of the French Medical Institute for Mothers and Children (FMIC), the French Medical Institute for Mothers and Children, went back to work. “Some colleagues have not returned, others are trying to leave Afghanistan.”This woman, who wants to maintain her anonymity in order to avoid retaliation (like the other voices in this text) explains.

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Gender segregation has already been a reality since 2001. Except college and elementary school. But with respect to 1996-2001, the change was significant. With the exception of a few local home school exceptions during that period, girls could not attend.

Other employees are waiting for approval to return to work, waiting to see how the Taliban are allowed to resume their operations under Islamic law (Photo: REUTERS)
Other employees are waiting for approval to return to work, waiting to see how the Taliban are allowed to resume their operations under Islamic law (Photo: REUTERS)

“I teach boys, so I don’t know if they will allow me to continue because I am a young woman”, The English teacher of the Kabul school agrees.

But the biggest concern of these educated women is their economic status. The country relies heavily on foreign aid to pay for its public services, and reducing international funding could have catastrophic consequences.

“Mothers and their babies are at risk because of problems at the clinic,” warns a midwife from Kandahar. “Infant mortality will increase.”

(With information from AFP)

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Esmond Harmon

"Entrepreneur. Social media advocate. Amateur travel guru. Freelance introvert. Thinker."

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